Becoming a Better Offensive Rebounder
Some thoughts and ideas on becoming a better offensive rebounder. Offensive rebounding boils down to flat out desire, effort and the consistency with which you attack the boards.

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Becoming a Better Offensive Rebounder

Some thoughts and ideas on becoming a better offensive rebounder. Offensive rebounding boils down to flat out desire, effort and the consistency with which you attack the boards.

Becoming a Better Offensive Rebounder

Offensive rebounding boils down to flat out desire, effort and the consistency with which you attack the boards.   If you go hard after a couple of offensive rebounds a game, that's one thing. If you are in good enough shape, and have the mindset to go after every rebound with quickness and aggressiveness, you'll really start to set yourself apart as a great rebounder.

Great offensive rebounders combine athletic talent, tactics, and technique, but their success is largely due to their desire to rebound the ball. So it's up to the individual player to make the decision to become a solid rebounder on the offensive end of the court.  Being a good offensive rebounder really boils down to a decision each time their team shoots the ball: are you going to go after this rebound with a vengeance, or be lazy and make a half-hearted effort to get the offensive board? Great rebounders make the first decision more often than not. Average and poor rebounders make the second decision more often than not.

Offensive rebounders need to make an initial effort to go after the rebound, but great rebounders also make more than one effort. Great offensive rebounders don't just go hard after the rebound once, or make one solid effort at getting in good position. Great players make multiple attempts at getting into good position to get the offensive board. Making one attempt to get around the defender is a good start. Making a second move (if the defender makes the effort to box out) is an even better effort and may be all it takes to be in good position to grab the board. Continuing on with a third or even fourth move is the mark of a great player.

Typically, a 2nd or 3rd strong and aggressive move to get into good position will be all anyone has time to make when a shot goes up. And it will often be all the time you need to get in good position, or at least put lots of pressure on the defensive player. Multiple efforts keep the defense honest: they know they've got their work cut out for them to keep the offensive player off the boards. That type of effort on the boards will tire the defense out over the course of a game, making things much easier for the offense over the course of a game.

Quickness is also hugely important when it comes to getting good offensive rebounding position. Since the defense is typically going to be between the offensive player and the basket when the shot goes up, the job of the offensive player is to get at least even with the defender (to get what might be considered equally good rebounding position), or better yet, get in front of the defender. The main way of accomplishing this is with a quick first step around the defender. If the defense moves to block out that initial move to the basket, countering with a spin move, or a quick step in the opposite direction is often enough to get by the opposing player. Regardless of what method is used, the key is to make these moves with speed and decisiveness. A very slow, weak, or methodical move will rarely work unless playing against a bad or lazy player, or if the defender happens to be offbalance or badly out of position.

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Becoming a Better Offensive Rebounder

Some thoughts and ideas on becoming a better offensive rebounder. Offensive rebounding boils down to flat out desire, effort and the consistency with which you attack the boards.

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